We Must Spread Love, Now More Than Ever

Conversation hearts cannot inspire dialogue—at least not the sort we need right now. “Text Me” and “U R Cute” will merely leave a chalky taste on your tongue. But, as Valentine’s Day continues to evolve, it’s obvious that one day dedicated to cardboard cupids and heart-shaped chocolates will not spread enough love to sustain our increasingly difficult fight against hate.

In today’s volatile political climate, it’s easy to drown underneath waves of anger. Leaders on one end of the spectrum regularly infuriate those on the opposing side, sparking outrage that results in an epic game of emotional Ping-Pong. Those wishing to instill fear go to extremes to cultivate animosity, while those working to alleviate worries aim to promote unity.

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Source: Getty Images

But on this, the greeting card holiday dedicated to love, we must look beyond romantic pursuits in order to show our affection for those who face undue persecution. Border walls and religious bans pollute the air where all the love’s supposed to be. We must treat this day as an opportunity to realign our own thought processes so we may continue to fight the good fight under the veil of justice, not disgust. If these destructive measures remain unchecked, our resistance also runs the risk of becoming disconnected from its primary purpose.

Going forward, we must pause frequently to reflect. We must collect our thoughts and reestablish our goals so we never lose sight of the love and togetherness on which this movement was built. We must commit to small actions and gestures every day so we never abandon the vital message behind our efforts.

Defend those who face unmerited hatred because their skin tone doesn’t match the winter snow. Black, Mexican, or Muslim—show these marginalized groups that their contributions to society cannot be overshadowed by the misdeeds of an extreme few. Pop that bubble you’ve been living in your entire life and engage those who don’t look or think like you. Despite popular belief, love isn’t blind. Instead, love grows from the willingness to open our hearts and minds to new people and possibilities.

But, above all else, we must not forget to love ourselves. Much of the anxiety plaguing our nation resides in the hearts of those who are unhappy with themselves. Insecure individuals project their internal doubts onto those who seem weak, punishing the innocent merely so they may reinforce their false confidence. They assert their supposed power by oppressing those who have very little power themselves.

We have the capacity to inspire revolutionary love—love that bonds people of all races, genders, and religions—but we’ve been complacent for far too long. Now’s the time to stand up for what we believe. Now’s the time to lend our voice to the voiceless. Now’s the time to spread love, not hate. Cupid doesn’t have enough arrows to take up arms against the foolish leaders of America. But if we, the people, march forth hand-in-hand, there’s nothing we can’t achieve together.

Source: Dreamy Addictions

Source: Dreamy Addictions

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From the Seeds of Hate, We Must Cultivate Love

Even the City of Love cannot escape the hate. </3

CTujsdZUkAEo0a4Tragedy strikes every day, whether the headlines say so or not. Terror—both domestic and foreign—has become so commonplace, in fact, we longer ask ourselves if, but when. When will my city become the next terrorist target? When will my school fall victim to mass murder? When will I end up another statistic in this war against gun violence? Refugees abroad continue to flee from this daily horror, risking their lives to escape an unbearable reality, and families at home grieve for loved ones lost, bombarded by prayers from government officials who still put their right to bear arms above their constituents’ ish to live without fear.

Today, however, our thoughts and prayers are with the people of Paris, France, as they seek to make sense of the terrorist attacks across their beloved city last night. Moments like these compel everyone to toss their trivial worries aside in solidarity. (Our parking tickets and broken phones no longer seem so devastating, after all.) Instead, we here in America cannot help but recall images of September 11th, when we were the nation in mourning. We remember the fear. We empathize with their despair. We reciprocate the uncertainty. Though attacks of any nature throughout the world assault our s
hared humanity, the Paris Attacks hit home, in particular, because they remind everyone that terror can wreak havoc anywhere, not just those countries ravaged by death each day.

In his statement, President Obama said: “This is an attack on all of humanity and the universal values we share… We are bound by timeless democratic values that the cowardice and perverse ideologues of extremist networks can never match, wherever they are. Such savagery can never threaten who we are. We will respond. We will overcome. We will endure.”

Many have noted, in the aftermath, that the recent attacks in Beirut and the perpetual plight of Syrian refugees fail to receive the media attention they deserve. But it’s in the wake of the Paris Attacks that we have the opportunity to raise awareness and gain support for all those suffering across the globe. While this tragedy has changed countless lives forever, we now have the opportunity to turn this negative into something positive by changing the way we perceived the world forever, as well.

As President Obama explained, these were attacks on all of humanity because, at our core, we are all essentially the same. No matter our religion, race, or nationality, we’re all made of skin and bones. We all yearn to live in peace. Every atrocity appeals to our solidarity, yet we inevitably fall back into the same self-centered rut as we bounce from tragedy to tragedy, dedicating ourselves to the given cause only momentarily before politicizing the events that have transpired in an effort to leverage personal agendas. Once again, we’re all related, but we fail to see eye to eye—brothers and sisters engaged in senseless sibling rivalry.

But in this instance, we can enact change once and for all. We can go beyond the blue, red, and white lights that adorn prominent buildings throughout the world. We can embrace our humanity and engage one another through peace and love, not resentment and hate. How many people must die—how many communities must crumble—before we channel our strengthen to fight for, not against, each other? To quote Martin Luther King, Jr.: “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

We discover life’s true value in the face of death. Let’s honor all victims’ lives—those in Paris and those around the world—by rooting our efforts in love, for we’ll inevitably nurture a garden in which hate can no longer grow.

(Image by Jean Jullien)