Posts Tagged ‘ Facebook ’

Stop Using Social Media as the Scapegoat for Society’s Demise

During the early morning hours of May 7, Nicki Minaj took to Twitter to help fans in need. Over the course of this dialogue, Minaj agreed to pay out an estimated $30,000 of her own money to help the fans in question afford their college tuition and school supplies. While many critics might be skeptical about the motive behind her random acts of philanthropy, it’s hard to ignore that Minaj’s generous soul would never have connected with these struggling individuals had it not been for social media.

Of course, it’s easy for people to focus on social media’s failings. It promotes narcissism. It’s an unyielding distraction. It hinders everyone’s attention span. However, along with the bad, we’ve been exposed to a world of good that outweighs any negative sentiment. We now have an outlet for connecting with people outside our immediate circle, allowing us to learn and grow in ways we never could have before its creation.

Thanks to Twitter (and the Web, in general), we have the opportunity to remain abreast of international news in real time. Yes, there’s an enormous amount of content to sift through at any given moment, but by adopting healthy social media habits, it’s simple to filter through what’s important and what’s frivolous fluff. You see, those who claim that social networks drain people’s time and ruin kids’ attention spans are those who’ve failed to master healthy social habits themselves. All good things must be consumed in moderation—even media. We may live in the era of the Netflix binge, but that doesn’t mean such behaviors are smart. When used properly, social media arms us with the tools necessary to dismantle widespread ignorance and hold public figures accountable. Social media acts as the weapon we need to effectively fight for what’s right.

Following the U.S. presidential election, for instance, voters quickly took to social media—in some cases to celebrate, in some cases to express their disbelief and anguish while establishing the foundation for what’s now known as The Resistance. Women came together via social to plan and execute the Women’s March on Washington, as well as its sister marches across the world. And organizations, such as Planned Parenthood and the ACLU, have turned to social media to mobilize supporters and bolster donations. Without such outlets, these groups never would’ve come together so quickly and effectively. Without social media, it would’ve been much more difficult for these like-minded activists to find one another and turn their mutual disgust into productive outreach.

Even in less extreme cases, social media has the potential to make people feel less alone. Prior to social networks, outcasts likely felt that there was no one else in the world who understood their struggle. But, by being able to express their emotions online, many have found support they might’ve otherwise gone without. Those with minor grievances can also take solace in social media, for the memes and comics that rule the space demonstrate we’re not as alone as we once thought. (No, you’re NOT the only one who feels that way!) Critics will argue that social media has the opposite effect, as Facebook and Instagram posts often make said outcasts feel even more out of the loop than before, but when you stop to evaluate the new connections at their fingertips, it’s easy to see that social empowers them to change their situation for the better.

Face it—bullies will never cease to exist. There’ll always be people who tear others down in order to make themselves feel superior, no matter their platform of choice. But it’s our responsibility to teach today’s children how to navigate these new networks. Our parents taught us how to handle the challenges that came along with growing up, and we’ll have to do the same. Kids still have to face the same battles, even if they’re fighting on uncharted battlefields. Remember! We’re the ones who created this supposed mess, so we’re the ones who will have to right the course. We will have to teach them how to limit their screen time. We will have to teach them how to be mindful of others online. We will have to teach them not to idolize the manipulated images and personas they see across platforms.

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Sailing on the “Unfriend” Ship

Sometimes, social networking seems more like social suicide.  While we gain the ability to easily stay in touch with far away friends, we also find ourselves spending more time typing than talking (as in, out loud… to their face).

But excessive exposure to the Internet can often lend itself to experimentation.

Having been on Facebook basically since its birth – anyone else remember when a person’s wall was just a blank spot people scrawled on at whim? – you come to accumulate many unnecessary acquaintances.  Some are friends, while others were merely “friended” as a way to amass an unspeakable number of connections.  But since we’ve come so far since those days without the stalker feed, many of those people we pretended to know seem entirely irrelevant.  Stars, like Jimmy Kimmel, have even instigated designated days where people “unfriend” those they don’t really know because, as Kimmel said, the Facebook “friend” concept cheapens the true sanctity of friendship as it used to be.

In one instance, I remember “unfriending” nearly 400 people from my supposed “friends” list.  I wasn’t even aware that I had met 400 people over my entire lifetime, so to have a grand total of over 600 “friends” on Facebook alone was rather ludicrous.  And now, during times of procrastination, I like to explore Facebook just to see who I’m still connected to and who has “unfriended” me during one of their clean sweeps.  (Honestly, you don’t notice who has suddenly disappeared from your feed until you see their comment on someone else’s wall and wonder why you haven’t seen any recent posts of theirs in forever.)

However, instead of feeling unimportant, I have a new life goal that I will need to accomplish soon, just in case Facebook goes out of style.  I want to become famous (preferably for my writing talents) and watch to see how many of my “unfriended” friends suddenly decide they know me and want to catch up.  Currently, I offer nothing more exciting than the occasional YouTube video and blog entry, but my famous self shall certainly intrigue the public (she says with a sarcastically haughty tone).  Thankfully, Facebook includes the convenient “Deny Request” button with all invitations.

Perhaps that sounds petty, or even a tad ungrateful, but they say you should never forget the little people and, well, clicking that ‘X’ next to my name means many have already forgotten about me.  Plus, no one wants to be friends with someone who only likes them because they’re famous, so I’ve got that argument to back me up, as well.

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